Euphues: the Anatomy of Wit: Euphues & His England

Euphues: the Anatomy of Wit: Euphues & His England

Euphues: the Anatomy of Wit: Euphues & His England

Euphues: the Anatomy of Wit: Euphues & His England

Excerpt

It is proper to make a statement concerning the division of editorial labours and responsibilities in the present work. It was begun by Mr. Clemons, who devoted scrupulous care to the production of the text--the first text of the Euphues in modern spelling and punctuation. The collation of texts stands almost as he left it. But in the process of writing the notes, evidence has sometimes come to me which has led me to prefer a different reading, or to desire emendation of the text for the removal of errors in the early editions, or to disapprove of emendations introduced (or accepted from other modern editors) by Mr. Clemons. In these cases I have thought it necessary to make the changes in Mr. Clemons' manuscript which my judgment approved; and I must therefore assume responsibility for doubtful points in the text and textual notes. Before he had proceeded further, Mr. Clemons decided to devote his life to work in the Protestant Missionary College at Nan King, China; and at his suggestion I undertook to complete the edition. I alone am responsible for the Introduction and the Notes, therefore, and I wish to make some explanations concerning each of these sections of the book.

The Introduction does not give all of the general information about the Euphues and its author which might be looked for by some readers. At first I intended to resume the knowledge of the subject gathered by scholars during recent years; and especially to describe the style which takes its name from the book, and to which, after all, it owes its chief interest now, as it did in its own day. But as I proceeded with the work, I found that I could not do this without seeming to accept a view of the history of the Euphuistic style which seemed to me to place it in false historical relations; nor could I justify my departure from the accepted view of Euphuism without entering upon a long and complex argument. The Introduction therefore is addressed chiefly to scholars; and I regret this fact the less because the task of describing the style of Euphues and the general criticism of Lyly and his work have been so admirably . . .

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