Panic Disorder: The Great Pretender

Panic Disorder: The Great Pretender

Panic Disorder: The Great Pretender

Panic Disorder: The Great Pretender

Synopsis

A comprehensive account of what panic is, where it comes from, and how to treat it. Four sections present a strong phenomenological introduction to panic, its classification, its etiology and treatment models. Offers numerous approaches to treatment--including practical clinical details--with cognitive therapies strongly recommended. Features a wealth of clinical descriptions and case studies.

Excerpt

After many years of diagnostic confusion and untreated emotional pain, help is now available for those who suffer from panic disorder, a common but complex anxiety disorder.

Although a significant psychological problem, seen frequently in clinical practice, panic disorder remained unidentified until 1980. In that year, the American Psychiatric Association took a giant step in listing this cluster of emotional and physical symptoms as a distinct diagnostic category with definite diagnostic criteria. This has been an aid to quicker, more accurate diagnosis. Substantial research into its etiology and pathophysiology has produced new biological clues and instigated more appropriate treatment for this widespread emotional problem.

Panic attacks come on suddenly and intensely out of the blue. Feeling apprehensive and anxious, the patient fears dying, going crazy, or losing control. During an attack, these individuals also experience multiple distressing physical symptoms, such as shortness of . . .

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