Time-Limited Dynamic Psychotherapy: A Guide to Clinical Practice

Time-Limited Dynamic Psychotherapy: A Guide to Clinical Practice

Time-Limited Dynamic Psychotherapy: A Guide to Clinical Practice

Time-Limited Dynamic Psychotherapy: A Guide to Clinical Practice

Synopsis

Ten years ago, Hans Strupp and Jeffrey Binder's Psychotherapy in a New Key introduced a powerful, empirically tested model of brief psychotherapy that has proven highly successful and changed the practice of psychotherapy forever. But until now, there has been no follow-up publication to make the model come alive. With this book, Hanna Levenson draws on her extensive experience with time-limited dynamic psychotherapy to let readers see the therapy in action. Time-limited dynamic psychotherapy provides a state-of-the-art model of treatment that incorporates current developments in psychoanalytic, interpersonal, object-relations, and self psychology theories, as well as cognitive-behavioral and systems approaches. This flexible approach to brief therapy is designed to treat people with long-standing dysfunctional relationships. This book emphasizes identification of interpersonal difficulties and teaches a method of focusing therapy that is behaviorally based and explicit.

Excerpt

Brief, the short-term, or time-limited psychotherapy is rapidly becoming the wave of the future. There are several major reasons for this development: First and foremost are the rising health care costs that have prompted the cries for "containment." Second, as a result of numerous empirical studies that have demonstrated the utility of psychotherapy as a treatment modality, a growing number of people are availing themselves of the services provided by the major mental health professions (psychiatry, clinical psychology, and psychiatric social work). Third, consumers are increasingly relying on third- party payers, primarily insurance companies and the government, to finance at least part of the cost of psychotherapy. Fourth, the number of therapists, primarily in clinical psychology and psychiatric social work, has steadily grown in recent years. These factors, among others, have helped lessen the stigma of being labeled a "psychiatric patient."

There can no longer be any serious doubt that, in an important sense, the "safety and efficacy" of psychotherapy have been demonstrated, although considerable controversy persists concerning the effectiveness of particular forms of psychotherapy for specific conditions, its value in relation to psychopharmacology, and the extent to which insurance companies and, more recently, managed care companies are willing to foot the bill for these treatments that have yet to be standardized or stringently defined. In short, Freud's prophecy that modified forms of psychoanalysis would spread and become widely available has come true, although many forms of psychotherapy practiced today have only a remote resemblance to orthodox psychoanalysis. Psychoanalysis itself has undergone a steady decline and has been replaced by a wide array of different forms of psychotherapy.

Gone, too, are the days when a course of psychotherapy of whatever kind might take many months or even years. The search for shorter . . .

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