Education and the Rise of the Corporate State

Education and the Rise of the Corporate State

Education and the Rise of the Corporate State

Education and the Rise of the Corporate State

Excerpt

It was Edward Krug The Shaping of the American High School that first interested me in the meaning of American liberal rhetoric as applied to education. Education, like democracy, is something everyone in America says they support, but exactly what they mean by education is never clearly stated. Liberalism in the twentieth century in both its early Progressive form and later development has staunchly supported education as a cure for social and economic problems. This, of course, had been Horace Mann's dream in the nineteenth century, but its full institutional realization occurred in the early twentieth century. For the past seventy years public educational institutions have played a leading role in campaigns to end urban poverty and crime, Americanize foreigners, heal the wounds of race relations, and rejuvenate an often sagging democratic spirit.

The purpose of this book is to explore the exact meaning Progressives gave to public education during its most formative period at the beginning of the twentieth century. Who were the Progressives is a highly debatable and elusive question. For the purpose of my study I am defining as the main body of Progressives those American leaders who adopted as the image of the good society a highly organized and smoothly working corporate structure. Members of this group of Progressives held . . .

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