Preparing Tomorrow's Business Leaders Today

Preparing Tomorrow's Business Leaders Today

Preparing Tomorrow's Business Leaders Today

Preparing Tomorrow's Business Leaders Today

Excerpt

Fifty years ago, toward the end of World War I, New York University first offered graduate instruction in business. It was, of course, not the first institution of higher learning to do so. In 1918 the Amos Tuck School at Dartmouth was almost twenty years old, and the Harvard Business School was approaching its tenth anniversary. Yet New York University, in its first venture into graduate education, however, did establish a "first." It was first to establish a graduate business curriculum leading to an advanced degree for educated men already well established in their business careers -- primarily at that time young executives in banking and finance. The educational venture of 1918, out of which the present Graduate School of Business Administration of New York University grew, was perhaps the first example of what we would now call "advanced management" education or "continuing" education for business executives. Significantly, this new institution was not established on a college campus or contiguous to it as its older sister institutions had been. It opened its doors in the heart of New York's financial district, surrounded by Wall Street banks, brokerage houses, and headquarters office buildings. By its choice of location, the new educational ven-

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