Physical Science and Physical Reality

Physical Science and Physical Reality

Physical Science and Physical Reality

Physical Science and Physical Reality

Excerpt

Any attempt to give a complete bibliography is doomed to failure. There are therefore undoubtedly many fine pieces not mentioned anywhere in this book. To their authors I apologize and plead the restrictions of time and the demands of exposition. What did not fit immediately and obviously into the points under discussion was not cited.

The book is intended both as a text and as an expression of personal opinions. It is hoped that it will be useful to those who seek an introduction to the philosophy of science as well as those who seek insight into the nature of science and its contributions to our knowledge of the external world. No attempt is made, however, to pander to those whose ignorance of the results of science make an appreciation of science impossible. I have, therefore, assumed that my readers will know something about science and its history. The examples and illustrations have, however, been taken from elementary physics as far as possible.

I have tried to avoid both popular science and entertaining history of science. This book is concerned with philosophical questions and issues and not with science proper or popular.

I wish to express my indebtedness to Professor C. Hempel, whose influence will be evident even where I disagree with him. The earlier half of the manuscript was written while I was on sabbatical as a Research Fellow at Yale University (1954) and I attended Hempel's lectures.

Mr. John Parker, Jr. very kindly helped read the proofs and made many valuable suggestions.

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