Inside Computer Understanding: Five Programs Plus Miniatures

Inside Computer Understanding: Five Programs Plus Miniatures

Inside Computer Understanding: Five Programs Plus Miniatures

Inside Computer Understanding: Five Programs Plus Miniatures

Synopsis

Presents a subset of the LISP programming language. For the cognitive scientist who is interested in learning how computer programs model theories of reasoning & understanding.

Excerpt

We have written this book for those who want to comprehend how a large natural language-understanding program works. the book had its beginnings as a result of a summer school we ran at Yale in June and July of 1978. During that winter, with the support of the Sloan Foundation's program in Cognitive Science, thirty- five professionals in Cognitive Science, mostly psychologists by training, were taught to grapple with the details of programming in Artificial Intelligence. As a part of the curriculum we designed for them, we created what we called "micro-programs." These micro-programs were an attempt to give students the flavor of using a large ai program without all the difficulty normally associated with learning a complex system written by another person. Thus, when we discussed our parser, eli, or our story understanding program, sam, we also gave students the micro versions of these programs, which were very simple versions that operated in roughly the same way as their larger brothers, but without all the frills. Students were asked to add pieces to the programs and otherwise modify them in order to learn how they worked.

Our feeling, and that of the students who used them, was that these micro programs were very useful pedagogically. We later used these same micro programs in our first year graduate course in ai. Further, we sent them out to other institutions where they were used and found to be helpful. From the positive response that we got, we decided it was time to put together a series of discussions and micro programs covering a number of the projects that we have done over the past few years.

In previous books, Conceptual Information Processing in 1975 and Scripts Plans Goals and Understanding in 1977, we have outlined what has come to be known as the "Yale view of AI". There, we have presented our theories of the language process in humans and how we can model that process on a digital . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.