Soviet Communism: Programs and Rules: Official Texts of 1919, 1952 (1956) 1961

Soviet Communism: Programs and Rules: Official Texts of 1919, 1952 (1956) 1961

Soviet Communism: Programs and Rules: Official Texts of 1919, 1952 (1956) 1961

Soviet Communism: Programs and Rules: Official Texts of 1919, 1952 (1956) 1961

Excerpt

This introduction is a brief review of the Program and Rules of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union approved and adopted at the Twenty-second Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union on October 31, 1961, and also a comparison of these documents with the superseded 1919 Party Program and the 1952 Party Rules. All of these four documents are included in this volume.

Program of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

The 1961 Program of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union is historically the third program of the Russian Party since the beginning of the century.

The first Party Program, adopted at the Second Congress in Brussels in 1903--and in part reprinted in the introductory portion of the second Party Program because it "correctly characterizes the nature of capitalism and of bourgeois society" (although it used "the incorrect designation of the party as the Social-Democratic Party")--began with an assertion of the growing contradiction between the exploiting capitalism and the exploited masses in bourgeois societies. It stated that this contradiction could be resolved only by a social revolution carried out by the proletariat. However, dictatorship of the proletariat was a "necessary condition" for such revolution in order that the resistance of the exploiting capitalism could be effectively and rapidly crushed. In Russia, the immediate aim of the Party, according to the Program, was the overthrow of the autocracy and its replacement by a democratic republic. This democratic republic was to bring about a series of reforms: political and civil freedoms, universal education, self-determination for all nationalities, election of judges, separation of church and state, and a militia in place of a standing army. In addition, the 1903 Program stipulated that the conditions of industrial work would be improved and that concessions would be made to the peasants "in the interests of the free development of class war in the villages."

This Program, endorsed by a few dozen angry radicals, revolution-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.