Weather Proverbs and Paradoxes

Weather Proverbs and Paradoxes

Weather Proverbs and Paradoxes

Weather Proverbs and Paradoxes

Excerpt

"So it falls that all men are
With fine weather happier far."

--KING ALFRED.

This thousand-year-old observation by England's wisest ruler recognizes the fact that fine weather induces good tempers, and therefore amply justifies the proverb that shrewdly bids one to "Do business with men when the wind is in the northwest," justifies it because when the wind is from that direction at any place in the temperate zone of the northern hemisphire, the region to which this proverb applies, the weather there is likely then to be fine and bracing, and hence one's mood buoyant, cheerful and hopeful--his best possible state for quick decision and bold enterprise.

But this effect on the minds of men does not exhaust the good and the evil of weather conditions, for our comfort, our convenience, and even the success or failure of whatever we undertake, all depend, in large measure, upon clear skies and cloudy, upon wind and rain, and upon everything else that renders the elements fair or foul. As wittily and truthfully said:

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