Freeing China's Farmers: Rural Restructuring in the Reform Era

Freeing China's Farmers: Rural Restructuring in the Reform Era

Freeing China's Farmers: Rural Restructuring in the Reform Era

Freeing China's Farmers: Rural Restructuring in the Reform Era

Synopsis

A comprehensive analysts of China's rural reforms, this book links local experiences to national policy, showing the dynamic tension in the reform process among state policy, local cadre power and self-interest, and the peasants' search for economic growth. Key topics covered include: the responsibility system, privatization and changing property rights, industrialization, social conflict, cadre corruption, urban-rural relations, conflict over land, rural urbanization, and the impact of globalization. The introduction skillfully integrates the themes that run throughout this work and the concluding chapter focuses on current and future problems in rural China.

Excerpt

Rarely have analysts been able to view unbridled popular interest at play in the prc. When Mao demolished the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) and the forces of order in the Cultural Revolution, long festering divisions among students and among workers burst into view. However, most reflections of popular views in China, particularly before the advent of surveys in the mid-and late- 1980s, were reconstructed by government "spin doctors" whose role was to filter citizen beliefs through a thick veneer of state interests before presenting them in official reports. Awareness of these distortions often leads us to wonder what people actually thought.

Looking at rural China in 1983, one would have assumed that all farmers, regardless of the socioeconomic, ecological, or political context in which they lived, strongly supported individual farming and the deconstruction of the collective system of agriculture. No doubt, many farmers were strong advocates of the dismantling of the communes; and some analysts argue that it was the farmers themselves who led the movement to end collective agriculture in China (see the introduction). Nevertheless, by 1983, all of rural society had completed the shift to individual agriculture. Despite provincial resistance and demands for some policy alterations, the state, through its power to impose policy conformity, had reconstructed rural institutions and norms into one pattern. Household farming good! Collective farming bad! Uniformity good! Diversity bad!

However, the process of socioeconomic change is a window through which . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.