The Crisis Manager: Facing Risk and Responsibility

The Crisis Manager: Facing Risk and Responsibility

The Crisis Manager: Facing Risk and Responsibility

The Crisis Manager: Facing Risk and Responsibility

Synopsis

As crises become more numerous, visible, and calamitous, organizations have no choice but to accept them as an inescapable reality that must be factored into their planning and decision making. This book is written for present and future crisis managers--men and women who will be drawn into that inevitable occurrence and whose performance will determine their organization's future as well as their own. It is also written for all managers because the lessons learned in crisis management add to their qualifications as policymakers and decision makers.

Organized into four parts, this book:

• provides a classification of seven crisis types that enables a manager faced with a crisis to place it within the most relevant category and apply the recommended strategies;

• supplements the recommended strategies on how to improve management performance so that future crises can be averted;

• examines the causes that lead up to crises, enabling a manager to take preventive action;

• recognizes the central role of crisis communication when a crisis event occurs;

• assigns critical importance to the impact of a crisis on an organization's reputation--an intangible asset that affects the long-term value and profitability of an organization; and

• urges managers on all levels and different functional areas of an organization to become familiar with crisis management so they know how their actions can prevent or mitigate crises.

Excerpt

As crises become more numerous, visible, and calamitous, organizations have no choice but to accept them as an inescapable reality that must be factored into their planning and decision making. This book is written for present and future crisis managers-men and women who will be drawn into that inevitable occurrence and whose performance will determine their organization's future as well as their own. It is also written for all managers because the lessons learned in crisis management add to their qualifications as policy makers and decision makers.

The stability and predictability sought by managers in their dealings with the marketplace and sociopolitical environment is less and less attainable. There are now so many discontinuities in the business environment that an extrapolation of past trends can no longer be trusted to predict the future. Managers must learn to make decisions under conditions of high uncertainty and to consider the interests not only of stockholders but of a wide network of stakeholders -- people who are affected by a company's decisions and actions and who, in turn, can affect the success of the company.

Managers have learned that they must engage in a new type of learning. They must go beyond "single-loop" learning, which simply finds better ways of doing what the organization is already doing, and engage in "double-loop" learning, which requires them to reconsider their goals and values, including the markets they serve and the environments in which they operate.

This reconsideration of goals and values in a climate of uncertainty demands an integrated approach to managerial problem solving that examines a wide range of factors-economic, social, political, and environmental -- as well as the involvement of all actual and potential stakeholders. Organi-

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