Unbroken Thread: An Anthology of Plays by Asian American Women

Unbroken Thread: An Anthology of Plays by Asian American Women

Unbroken Thread: An Anthology of Plays by Asian American Women

Unbroken Thread: An Anthology of Plays by Asian American Women

Synopsis

'The plays in this volume span the range of Asian American women's experiences with passion, wit, anger, and blazing theatricality. Robert Uno's volume redresses a long-neglected gap in theatrical literature by bringing together six outstanding dramatic pioneers, whose innovations in story and form unleash new fire onto the American stage.'--David Henry Hwang

Excerpt

I am struck not with lines drawn between parents and children but how the parents' and children's lives flow into each other, how the father becomes the son and how the daughter is the mother. Thus, there is both change and continuity: there is no break, no incompatibility between "East" and "West." --Elaine Kim, "Not 'the Best of Both Worlds': Issues of Identity in Asian American Writing"

The six plays of this anthology represent some of the best dramatic literature written by Asian American women since the 1970s. Each is a groundbreaking work and addresses in its own way the experiences of Asians in America. Included are plays by pioneering writers Wakako Yamauchi and Momoko Iko, as well as works written by "second-generation" writers Genny Lim and Velina Hasu Houston and by younger writers Jeannie Barroga and Elizabeth Wong. All six playwrights are American-born daughters of Asian immigrants, and their voices span the genres of naturalism, impressionism, ritual drama, postmodern collage, and media-influenced episodic drama.

Although the plays are grounded in the individual cultural sensibilities of their Chinese American, Japanese American, Amerasian, and Filipino American authors, they speak of common experiences. The themes of isolation and captivity, both physical and metaphorical, run throughout. For the immigrants of Lim Paper Angels, the immigration detention center on Angel Island in San Francisco Harbor is a prison from which they can see Gam Saan, the Gold Mountain. In The Music Lessons, a widow and her chil-

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