Political Discussions, Legislative, Diplomatic, and Popular, 1856-1886

Political Discussions, Legislative, Diplomatic, and Popular, 1856-1886

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Political Discussions, Legislative, Diplomatic, and Popular, 1856-1886

Political Discussions, Legislative, Diplomatic, and Popular, 1856-1886

Read FREE!

Excerpt

[Extract from a speech delivered by Mr. Blaine before a Republican mass meeting at Farmington, Maine, July 4, 1860, at which Honorable Israel Washburn, Republican candidate for Governor, formally opened the campaign.]

I SINCERELY thank you, Mr. Chairman and Republicans of Franklin County, for the honor you have conferred upon me by your invitation to join our distinguished candidate for Governor in formally opening the State and Presidential campaigns in Maine. We have had the great pleasure of hearing Mr. Washburn, and I am sure we all feel that in his eloquent and exhaustive speech on the leading National issue he has left little for other speakers to say. If his speech made one impression upon my mind stronger than any other, it was that we do a wrong to our State and to the Nation to withdraw him from Congress to make him Governor of the State, when his services in the House of Representatives had so fully ripened him for the closing battles of that conflict for free territory, in which, for the past, ten years, he has borne so conspicuous and so honorable a part. But it is now too late to change, and we must content ourselves with the belief that if we lose a brilliant Representative in Congress we shall secure an equally brilliant Governor, and that Mr. Rice, who is nominated as his successor in the National field, will faitliffilly uphold the principles which Mr. Washburn's long career has so fitly illustrated.

It is interesting and important for us, at the initial point of the National campaign, to see how the events of four years have deepened and broadened the issue upon which the Republican party was organized, and how that party, growing and strengthening in all the States of the North, has enlarged the creed of principles which first constituted its political faith. The vote for Frémont, in 1856, though the party had been hastily . . .

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