Night Has a Thousand Eyes: A Naked-Eye Guide to the Sky, Its Science, Its Lore

Night Has a Thousand Eyes: A Naked-Eye Guide to the Sky, Its Science, Its Lore

Night Has a Thousand Eyes: A Naked-Eye Guide to the Sky, Its Science, Its Lore

Night Has a Thousand Eyes: A Naked-Eye Guide to the Sky, Its Science, Its Lore

Synopsis

Do you sometimes wonder why the sky at dusk is filled with color, or how the moon controls the tides? Why do stars twinkle and planets don't? Filled with science and lore, with references to myths, legends, and "high" and popular culture, this "naked-eye" guide (no telescope required) demystifies the celestial in accessible, instructive, and entertaining prose.

Upgren tells us why werewolves only come out at night and how to find Betelgeuse. He discusses twilight, the seasons and their causes, our solar system, light and darkness, weather, stars and latitude, the moon, light pollution, and the planets. Night Has a Thousand Eyes is the perfect resource for amateur astronomers and meteorologists of all ages who pause to enjoy sunsets and identify constellations on a starry night.

Excerpt

I wish I had Night Has a Thousand Eyes when I began observing the night sky more than 35 years ago. On a warm evening in August of 1960, I had nothing but a small telescope. With nothing but me and the stars, I had no idea where to start. So with scope in hand, I turned to the brightest "star" in the sky. That star, it turned out, was Jupiter -- its four moons and two dark bands gave away the presence of the biggest planet in the solar system.

On that night I had no idea that the distant planet would someday be a central focus of my life. In July 1994, a comet I helped discover, Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9, struck Jupiter, producing the largest explosion ever seen in the solar system. For me, it was the culmination of many happy and interesting years under the night sky. These years were spent first learning the constellations one by one, and then finding, through a telescope, the deeper wonders that were out there.

With the help of Arthur Upgren's book, you too now have the chance to go out on a starlit evening and make your own acquaintance with the stars. The author has a vast experience with the sky and with teaching it to others. Clearly written and easy to understand, his book will point you to the stars in a way that should make them lasting friends.

David H. Levy Vail, Arizona . . .

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