Peace-Keeping by U.N. Forces, from Suez to the Congo

Peace-Keeping by U.N. Forces, from Suez to the Congo

Peace-Keeping by U.N. Forces, from Suez to the Congo

Peace-Keeping by U.N. Forces, from Suez to the Congo

Excerpt

The use of force under international aegis is a much larger subject than that of this monograph, which, omitting to examine the United Nations operation in Korea, concerns the Organization's experience with military and semi-military groups recruited on an international basis and deployed on behalf of the Organization itself by its executive officers. Nor have we attempted an exhaustive account of the United Nations operation in the Congo: The important aspect of nonmilitary technical assistance is not referred to, and even the financial difficulties that the Organization has encountered as a result of its military expenditures in the Congo are merely touched upon. Though several of the UNF's actions in the Congo receive more detailed attention, it is not pretended that this monograph is a military history of the operation. Our intention has been to digest the experience from Suez to the Congo, so as to bring to light some of the limitations and possibilities of the United Nations forces as means for the preservation of international peace and, in the Congo instance, of internal law and order.

Some of the material employed was originally prepared for papers read at the Australian National University in December, 1960, and at the Conference of the Australian and New Zealand Association of Scientists, meeting in Brisbane in May, 1961. The enterprise was discussed at length by one of the authors with members of the Center of International Studies at Princeton University toward the end of 1961. The authors wish particularly to thank Professors Richard A. Falk, Leon Gordenker, and Klaus Knorr; Miss Jean Mac- Lachlan, also of the Center of International Studies, who has undertaken the editing of the manuscript; Miss Catherine Hoskyns of the Royal Institute of International Affairs, Chatham House, London, England; and Professor W. T. R. Fox of the Institute for War and Peace Studies, Columbia University, New York, N.Y.

A. L. B. N. H.

Australian National University June 8, 1962 . . .

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