The Negro and Employment Opportunity

The Negro and Employment Opportunity

The Negro and Employment Opportunity

The Negro and Employment Opportunity

Excerpt

As Dr. Taylor remarked in the foreword, this book developed from a conference sponsored by the Labor Relations Council of the Wharton School of Finance and Commerce, University of Pennsylvania, that was held in November, 1964. When the conference was being developed, it was determined to bring together the leading scholars in the field and representatives of those companies that had done the most effective job of integration over a long period of time. After the conference was completed, the material looked so promising that plans were made to publish it. Additional contributors were secured in order to make the book more comprehensive.

Part I of the book deals with general problems. In the introductory essay, Professor Ray Marshall of the University of Texas analyzes the job problems of Negroes from an overall point of view. He stresses the need for an increase in economic growth and an attack on the special structural problems of unemployment if progress is to be made toward equal opportunity. Dr. Marshall thus attempts to bridge the gap between the apostles of "growthmanship" and those of structural analysis as means of alleviating the overall situation.

Dr. Marshall's essay is followed by an unusual contribution by Professor Lowell Gallaway of the Wharton School. Dr. Gallaway uses hitherto unpublished data compiled by the Social Security Administration to analyze the differential between Negro and white income. His gloomy conclusion is that as the Negro grows older, he tends to go backward rather than forward in comparative earnings. Unfortunately, this is all too true. Scholars and practitioners alike will find in Dr. Gallaway's data additional proof of the difficult job ahead if equal opportunity is to be created.

In Part II, two views of equal rights and equal opportunity legislation are presented. Mr. George Schermer, a long-time practitioner in the field and now a consultant, discusses the effectiveness of equal opportunity legislation from the point of view of the administrator. He finds that the effectiveness is sometimes overplayed and that there is a limited effect of such legislation. Dr. Northrup covers much of the same ground, but more from the point of view of the impact on companies and unions. He emphasizes that neither this legislation nor equal pay laws have any extended opposition from management or labor, but that nevertheless their . . .

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