Education in the South

Education in the South

Education in the South

Education in the South

Excerpt

The story of public education during the last quarter- century in those states which had formed the Confederacy is a unique and somewhat remarkable record. But an adequate understanding of it or of the present educational status and problems of the South requires a view not only of the actual educational situation twenty-five years ago but also of the social, economic, and political conditions which had prevailed there for two or three decades following the Civil War. A summary of that situation and an account of those conditions become therefore an important part of the story here to be related.

The Continuing Effects of the Civil War -- Educational

The chief need of the South twenty-five years ago was a full and working agreement on education. The principle of universal education at public expense had not yet passed into conviction there. It was still in the academic stage, the topic of the educator and theorist. It had not yet become the interest of the citizen. Compared with the United States as a whole, the Southern states were very backward in education. Public schools were deplorably poor and ineffective. The average annual per capita expenditure for public education in 1897 was $2.62 in the country at large, but in the South it was less than ninety cents and in some Southern states it was less than fifty cents. The amount raised per taxpayer was twice as large and the amount . . .

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