Linguistic Genocide in Education, or Worldwide Diversity and Human Rights?

Linguistic Genocide in Education, or Worldwide Diversity and Human Rights?

Linguistic Genocide in Education, or Worldwide Diversity and Human Rights?

Linguistic Genocide in Education, or Worldwide Diversity and Human Rights?

Synopsis

In this powerful, multidisciplinary book, Tove Skutnabb-Kangas shows how most indigenous and minority education contributes to linguistic genocide according to United Nations definitions. Theory is combined with a wealth of factual encyclopedic information and with many examples and vignettes. The examples come from all parts of the world and try to avoid Eurocentrism. Oriented toward theory and practice, facts and evaluations, and reflection and action, the book prompts readers to find information about the world and their local contexts, to reflect and to act. A Web site with additional resource materials to this book can be found at http://www.ruc.dk/~tovesk/

Excerpt

Outline of the Book ix

How to Use the Book -- Some Advice to the Reader xiii

Who Might Want to Read the Book xv

Acknowledgments xvi

OUTLINE OF THE BOOK

What is this book about? Here is a short description.

Languages are today being killed and linguistic diversity is disappearing at a much faster pace than ever before in human history, and relatively much faster than biodiversity. The book starts with a short exposé of the present 'health' situation of the world's languages and the prospects for them during the next few generations. The conclusion is that the future looks grim -- if things continue, we may kill over 90 percent of the world's oral languages in the next 100 years.

It is claimed that linguistic and cultural diversity are as necessary for the existence of our planet as biodiversity. They are correlated: where one type is high, the other one is too. There seems to be mounting evidence that the relationship between linguistic and cultural diversity on the one hand and biodiversity on the other hand is not only correlational but might be causal. Theories of human-environment coevolution have been proposed, including the assumption that cultural diversity might enhance biodiversity or vice . . .

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