Teaching and Learning in Medical and Surgical Education: Lessons Learned for the 21st Century

Teaching and Learning in Medical and Surgical Education: Lessons Learned for the 21st Century

Teaching and Learning in Medical and Surgical Education: Lessons Learned for the 21st Century

Teaching and Learning in Medical and Surgical Education: Lessons Learned for the 21st Century

Synopsis

The idea for this book was originally conceived by Terrill Mast in conversations with Roland Folse. Dr. Mast was dedicated to the belief that all medical teachers should be generalists with skills and knowledge in all aspects of the field. Before his untimely death, he recruited most of the prestigious contributors to this important new book. This comprehensive volume features a review of the major topics in medical and surgical education by today's leading authorities in the field. The assembled authors represent a "Who's Who" in medical education around the world. Each chapter provides a state-of-the-art overview of the topic along with the projected changes most likely to occur over the next decade. A "must-have" for anyone responsible for educating students, residents, and physicians in the medical and surgical fields, this new book addresses the critical medical educational issues of the next millennium, in one, comprehensive volume.

Excerpt

This book was initially the idea of Terrill Mast, developed in conversations with Roland Folse. Mast was dedicated to the belief that all teachers in medicine should be generalists with skills and knowledge in all aspects of the field. Before his untimely death, he had recruited many of the contributors to this book. Linda Distlehorst, Gary Dunnington, and Roland Folse have handsomely carried out this orientation by providing us with the insights of experienced educators working in the wide areas of medical education.

Medical education emerged as a recognized field in the early 1960's, heralded by the ground breaking, seminal book, Teaching and Learning in Medical School (Miller, 1996). To those of us heavily involved in teaching medical students, residents, and physicians in continuing medical education as part of full-time academic responsibilities, along with patient care and research, it came as an exciting and welcome revelation. Two of the authors of that book, Steve Abrahamson and the lateGeorge Miller, were the founding fathers of the medical educational movement in this country. Much of the expanding developments in medical education are from those who have worked with or were influenced by those giants, either primarily or secondarily. It seems appropriate that the opening chapter of this book is by Steve Abrahamson.

In the first medical educational workshop I ever attended, two years into my first academic appointment, Steve made the point that just because most of us in the workshop were experts or "-ologists" of some type or other, we could not conclude that we knew how to teach our "-ology." Now 40 years later, with the even more complex demands of practicing medicine, this truism is even more valid. There is no place in medical education for faculty to teach by the seat of the pants, the way they were taught, not questioning what or how they should teach, any more than there would be a place for such an approach in research or patient care. Anyone with responsibility for educating students, residents, and physicians should be skilled and well informed about medical education--as preparing these learners to provide safe, humane, and effective care for the members of our society is a heavy responsibility. This book provides both new and established medical teachers with rich information on the present state of medical education.

Howard S. Barrows, MD
Southern Illinois University School of Medicine . . .

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