Visual Revelations: Graphical Tales of Fate and Deception from Napoleon Bonaparte to Ross Perot

Visual Revelations: Graphical Tales of Fate and Deception from Napoleon Bonaparte to Ross Perot

Visual Revelations: Graphical Tales of Fate and Deception from Napoleon Bonaparte to Ross Perot

Visual Revelations: Graphical Tales of Fate and Deception from Napoleon Bonaparte to Ross Perot

Synopsis

To function in modern society complex data must be absorbed and understood at a breakneck pace. The most efficient way to do this is through data-based graphics. This book is an exploration and celebration of graphical methods of data presentation. Visual Revelations' principal purpose is to enlighten, inform, and amuse the reader regarding the shortcomings of common graphical practices; particularly how they can misinform while simultaneously providing models of wonderful graphics. There are many examples of the best graphic practice, graphs that go beyond conveying, facts, and structure to be able to carry emotion as well. Aimed at an educated, lay audience, this volume benefits anyone who must either convey or receive quantitative information, including designers, statisticians, and people in the media.

Excerpt

"Hear, forget; see, remember." the wisdom of this ancient Confucian saying is apparent. Memorable memorials are visual. Who can ever forget the tragedy chronicled by the austere black granite wall that is the Vietnam Memorial? It is massive in form and content, built from the space taken by the more than 58,000 names inscribed upon it. As the loss of life increases, so too does the height of the wall, and the emotions it evokes. It is a very personal thing. William A. Atwell, Terry Lee Dillard, Ward K. Patton, Jerry Lee Graves, Edward J. Downs, John E. Rice, Jack M. Strong--these names join with thousands of others to form the wall. the interaction of the monument with those who come to it, whether to seek out a particular name or to picnic, often becomes part of the diverse images we take away with us. the tragedy of Vietnam written in the small becomes large and indelible.

Napoleon's Russian Campaign

Memorializing that portion of the generation of young French men lost in Napoleon's ill-fated Russian campaign was surely part of Charles Joseph Minard's motivation in the construction of his famous 1869 graphic. Minard's plot, shown in figure 1, depicts the movement of the French army from the time it crossed the Polish-Russian border with 422,000 men in June of 1812. the shrinking size of the army is characterized by the progressive narrowing of the broad band stretching across the map. in the original scale, each millimeter of its width represents 10,000 men. When the army reached Moscow in September, only 100,000 remained. the city was deserted, and the army began its retreat, depicted by the darker line below. It is linked to the temperature scale showing quantitatively the depths of the Russian winter. the banks of the Berezina River were littered with the bodies of the 22,000 men who perished as the November temperature . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.