The Generative Study of Second Language Acquisition

The Generative Study of Second Language Acquisition

The Generative Study of Second Language Acquisition

The Generative Study of Second Language Acquisition

Synopsis

The vast majority of work in theoretical linguistics from a generative perspective is based on first language acquisition and performance. The vast majority of work on second language acquisition is carried out by scholars and educators working within approaches other than that of generative linguistics. In this volume, this gap is bridged as leading generative linguists apply their intellectual and disciplinary skills to issues in second language acquisition. The results will be of interest to all those who study second language acquisition, regardless of their theoretical perspective, and all generative linguists, regardless of the topics on which they work.

Excerpt

This book is the result of a conference entitled Recent Advances in the Generative Study of Second Language Acquisition, held at MIT in January 1993. The purpose of this conference was to survey and review a very specific domain of second language (L2) acquisition research -- that developed within a Universal Grammar (UG) framework. More specifically, we sought to examine the theoretical and empirical developments in this area of research since 1985, when we convened an NSF-funded conference entitled Linguistic Theory and Second Language Acquisition. At the 1985 conference we brought together three groups: theoretical linguists working within a UG framework, psycholinguists interested in UG formulations, and a small group of researchers active in L2 acquisition research within a UG framework. The purpose of this 1985 conference, at its most general level, was:

to examine the extent to which a theory of UG could be useful in explaining the L2 acquisition process. That is, can we find any evidence for the role of UG in L2 acquisition? If so, in what ways and in what domains? In addition, we also sought to delineate a set of questions that could serve as a focus for continued research within this paradigm and others. Finally, we sought to examine the extent to which L2 acquisition findings might uniquely contribute to the development of a theory of UG. (Flynn & O'Neil, 1988, p. 2)

In 1985, the development of the field of L2 acquisition within a UG framework was in its infancy. Thus, we wanted a diverse group of researchers in attendance at this conference, both to generate the richest level of discus-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.