Women & Christian Origins

Women & Christian Origins

Women & Christian Origins

Women & Christian Origins

Synopsis

This sparkling collection of new essays addresses a wide range of issues surrounding women's lives in the early Christian period. The first set of articles supply the historical and social contexts. The contributors go on to address issues surrounding the representation of women in the Gospels, women in the Pauline tradition, and finally, attitudes toward women in the early church and the roles played by early Christian women. The most comprehensive look available on the Christian origins from women's point of view and Christian feminist theology, this book will be essential reading for students and others interested in these topics.

Excerpt

The last twenty years has seen an extraordinary flowering of exciting studies on women, gender, and religion in formative Western antiquity. Yet standard introductions to the New Testament and the origins of Christianity rarely integrate this compelling research. To date, no one has written a comprehensive treatment of women and Christian origins appropriate for a wide audience ranging from undergraduates to general readers to scholars previously unacquainted with this literature. In commissioning the chapters in this volume, we hoped to assemble an anthology that could both serve as a companion to existing textbooks and handbooks and stand on its own as an introduction to the study of women and Christian origins.

Although these chapters represent the diverse stances and scholarship of their authors, all have in common a commitment to the significance of integrating the study of women into the study of Christian origins, as well as a commitment to the importance of recognizing the centrality of ideas about gender in understanding ancient culture and religion. The abundance of recent discussions of "gender" and "sex" by theorists (whether steeped in antiquity or not) suggests that we are far from a sufficient, let alone complete, analysis of the categories and phenomena to which these terms may refer. Nevertheless, the authors of these chapters share the conviction that masculinity and femininity as categories are socially constructed and performative, and that in antiquity, as in modernity, the meanings of these categories and the values attached to them are cultural products and not "given" in any inherent biological nature.

Equally important, all the authors of these chapters agree on the utility of feminist approaches and critique, although as individuals, they may differ in . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.