Queerly Phrased: Language, Gender, and Sexuality

Queerly Phrased: Language, Gender, and Sexuality

Queerly Phrased: Language, Gender, and Sexuality

Queerly Phrased: Language, Gender, and Sexuality

Synopsis

Queerly Phrased is a groundbreaking collection of previously unpublished essays that examine the relationship between language and the construction of gender and sexuality. Bridging the gap between sociolinguistics and gay studies, the contributors draw on traditional models of language anaylsis of well as recent developments in gender theory to show how language plays a crucial role in the creation of culture and its representation.

Excerpt

Sociolinguistics is the study of language in use. With special focus on the relationships between language and society, its principal concerns address the forms and functions of variation across social groups and across the range of communicative situations in which women and men deploy their verbal repertoires. In short, sociolinguistics examines discourse as it is constructed and co-constructed, shaped and reshaped, in the interactions of everyday life and as it reflects and creates the social realities of that life.

While some linguists examine the structure of sentences independent of who is speaking or writing and to whom, independent of what precedes and what follows in a discourse, and independent of setting, topic, and purpose, sociolinguists investigate linguistic expression embedded in its social and situational contexts in everyday life. Interest in linguistic matters among language observers who are not professional linguists also focuses on language in use, for it is only there that the intricacies of social structure are reflected and the situational and strategic influences that shape our discourse are mirrored.

With Queerly Phrased, Oxford Studies in Sociolinguistics presents its first volume addressing the intersection in the web of language, gender, and sexuality. The volume editors, Anna Livia and Kira Hall, have commissioned essays that are mostly anthropological-linguistic or sociolinguistic but also literary/critical. In an era when queer theory and feminist theory have played increasingly prominent roles in furthering out understanding of the place of language in literature and . . .

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