European Perspectives on Hispanic Literature of the United States

European Perspectives on Hispanic Literature of the United States

European Perspectives on Hispanic Literature of the United States

European Perspectives on Hispanic Literature of the United States

Excerpt

Over the last ten years French students and scholars have expressed a sustained and genuine interest in the Hispanic communities of the United States. Efforts have been made to acquire documentation -- primary and secondary sources -- to establish contacts with Hispanic scholars, writers and artists, to introduce their works to French bookstores and university libraries, to include them in the syllabi of certain courses. In 1985 a course was taught at the graduate level in all French universities; on that occasion the University of Bordeaux published a collection of essays ( Cazemajou). Today more students are doing research in that field and two Ph.D. dissertations were recently presented at the University of Paris VII ( Grandjeat, Menendez). More are in progress.

The March 1986 International Conference on "Hispanic Cultures and Identities in the United States" which was held in Paris was organized in order to promote interest and research in this new field. Individual scholars or poets had been invited to various centers ( Toulouse, Bordeaux, Aix and Dijon. . . .) to give readings of their works or to participate in workshops and conferences. The 1986 conference was, however, the first important gathering bringing together European and American scholars, French students and academics, Hispanic critics, artists, writers. We deliberately expanded the theme of earlier European Conferences (in Paris on Puerto Rico in 1975, in Gemersceim, Germany, on Chicanos in 1984). We included discussion on several groups (mostly Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans and Cubans) in a comparative perspective. Our objective was to attempt to analyze the range and significance of cross-cultural exchanges between the worlds to which each of these communities are related: Latin American, Mexican, Caribbean, North American, Spanish. . . . Although the emphasis was on present trends, we were also interested in tracing historical developments. Finally, the conference was interdisciplinary: it invited specialists from various fields -- anthropology, sociology, history, art and literary criticism -- to confront each other's theories and points of view. The theme "Hispanic identities and cultures" was controversial since it raised a series of interrogations: on the existence . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.