The Greening of Marxism

The Greening of Marxism

The Greening of Marxism

The Greening of Marxism

Synopsis

When the ecological movement emerged in the 1960s, it warned that continued consumerism and growth would lead to ecological catastrophe. This "green" philosophy represented a challenge to the basic tenets of Marxism, which traditionally ignored issues of ecological sustainability. Tracing the history of the integration of ecological understanding with Marxist philosophy, The Greening of Marxism explores the influence of green politics on Marxism, examines the new politics emerging from these movements, and shows how red-green alliances can transform the political landscape.

Excerpt

This book series titled Democracy and Ecology is a contribution to the debates on the future of the global environment and "free market economy" and the prospects of radical green and democratic movements in the world today. While some call the post-Cold War period the "end of history," others sense that we may be living at its beginning. These scholars and activists believe that the seemingly all-powerful and reified world of global capital is creating more economic, social, political, and ecological problems than the world's ruling and political classes are able to resolve. There is a feeling that we are living through a general crisis, a turning point or divide that will create great dangers, and also opportunities for a nonexploitative, socially just, democratic ecological society. Many think that our species is learning how to regulate the relationship that we have with ourselves and the rest of nature in ways that defend ecological values and sensibilities, as well as right the exploitation and injustice that disfigure the present world order. Others are asking hard questions about what went wrong with the worlds that global capitalism and state socialism made, and about the kind of life that might be rebuilt from the wreckage of ecologically arid socially bankrupt ways of working and living. The Democracy and Ecology series rehearses these and related questions, poses new ones, and tries to respond to them, if only tentatively and provisionally, because the stakes are so high, and since "time-honored slogans and time-worn formulae" have become part of the problem, not the solution.

JAMES O'CONNOR Series Editor . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.