Poor Eaters: Helping Children Who Refuse to Eat

Poor Eaters: Helping Children Who Refuse to Eat

Poor Eaters: Helping Children Who Refuse to Eat

Poor Eaters: Helping Children Who Refuse to Eat

Synopsis

Finally a comprehensive guide has arrived for frustrated parents who have trouble feeding their children. Dr. Macht, a respected educational psychologist, has originated strategies that have achieved remarkable results in getting children to eat right. Dr. Macht cuts to the root of the dilemma and emphasizes the relationship between a child's total family environment and his eating disorder. The individuality of each child is an important factor in assessing the most suitable approach for dealing with food refusal. This valuable book constitutes a major breakthrough for parents, physicians, and educators alike. It offers parents a hoped-for reprieve from the battle that often takes place at the kitchen table, But most of all, it will change the lives of countless children who will finally learn to appreciate and enjoy the benefits of healthy eating.

Excerpt

Food refusal on the part of children has been an issue that has bothered parents and. clinicians for generations. How often has one heard, "Why won't Johnny eat and gain weight?" Similarly, "Why won't he try something new without creating such a fuss?" the factors contributing to food refusal are often complicated, often difficult to understand; the answers to such frustrating questions often difficult to come by. 'What is clear, however, is that on occasion, children's food refusal can have many profound effects, including failure to gain weight and to thrive. It is somewhat unclear how prevalent food refusal is. We do know that approximately 1 to 5% of admissions to hospital pediatric wards are for the evaluation and treatment of failure to thrive. Food refusal as a contributing factor leading to failure to thrive, inadequate weight gain, and nutritional imbalance must be included in these figures. Food refusal, total or partial, can become an unpleasant focal point for family dynamics, assuming a disproportionate role in terms of both interactive time and energy.

General food refusal and failure to thrive as a clinical entity has been of concern to child-care providers for centuries. It was described among the poor in New York City in the 1890s, as well as in infants in foreign institutions, and then again in orphanages in the United States. Failure to thrive specifically, often presenting itself acutely, has been associated with extreme social deprivation, with . . .

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