The Stony Brook Site and Its Relation to Archaic and Transitional Cultures on Long Island

The Stony Brook Site and Its Relation to Archaic and Transitional Cultures on Long Island

The Stony Brook Site and Its Relation to Archaic and Transitional Cultures on Long Island

The Stony Brook Site and Its Relation to Archaic and Transitional Cultures on Long Island

Excerpt

Coastal New York, of which Long Island forms the principal segment, appears on current evidence to have been visited or inhabited by man since about 5000 B. C. Two recorded examples of the Clovis style of fluted point, one of the earliest known New World projectile forms, found near Greenport and Bridgehampton, respectively, apparently attest to the brief presence of the paleo-Indian on eastern Long Island. More numerous examples of this widely distributed pre-Folsom point, dated before 10,000 years ago in the southern plains and desert basin area of New Mexico and Arizona, occur in the Hudson Valley and north of Long Island Sound in lower New England.

After about 3000 B. C., by extrapolation from radiocarbon dated central and eastern New York sites, and for more than 2,000 years, the Coastal region shared with inland New York and adjacent areas, a sparse and scattered population of hunters, fishermen and collectors of wild vegetal foods, in an Archaic stage of culture. These people seem to have had a central-based wandering community pattern, that is, during most of the year they moved from place to place, living for varying periods of time on the local food resources, and spent the remaining time at a semipermanent base camp to which they brought preservable wild foods, such as acorns and smoked or dried meat and fish. One such band of preceramic transients left its humble stone artifacts in the lower or older midden accumulation at Stony Brook. Still another and probably earlier Archaic group was responsible for the different types of projectile points found by us at Wading River and described later in this report.

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