No Bended Knee: The Battle for Guadalcanal : the Memoir of Gen. Merrill B. Twining USMC (Ret.)

No Bended Knee: The Battle for Guadalcanal : the Memoir of Gen. Merrill B. Twining USMC (Ret.)

No Bended Knee: The Battle for Guadalcanal : the Memoir of Gen. Merrill B. Twining USMC (Ret.)

No Bended Knee: The Battle for Guadalcanal : the Memoir of Gen. Merrill B. Twining USMC (Ret.)

Synopsis

There are many books chronicling the battle for Guadalcanal, and all of them have depended on the after-action report compiled by Merrill B. Twining. This report contained a number of shortcomings, and in this book Twining sets the record straight.

Excerpt

Guadalcanal was an immense battle--at sea, in the air, and most certainly on land. It was at this improbable place, an island in the southern Solomons chain, that the Americans and Japanese first slugged it out toe to toe in all three elements. the bitter struggle resulted in the loss of 1,200 aircraft, 49 ships, and as many as 35,000 American and Japanese lives. Although the issue was often in doubt, the Americans finally won. Major Gen. Kiyotake Kawaguchi, commander of the Japanese forces charged with destroying the U.S. Marine invaders, described his defeat for posterity in these words: "Guadalcanal is not the name of an island. It is the name of the graveyard of the Japanese army."

Kawaguchi was correct. All of Japan's victories occurred during the war's first year. After their defeat at Guadalcanal the Japanese never enjoyed another successful offensive. the gateway to Tokyo had been opened by the gallant men--land, sea, and air--who fought on a shoestring and triumphed in that horrific campaign.

While much has been written about the actions on and around Guadalcanal, Marine Corps operations there have not, until now, received the detailed evaluative treatment they deserve. the principal written record from which historians usually take departure is the 1st Marine Division's after- action report. Its sources were meager, many having been destroyed at the direction of Maj. Gen. Alexander A. Vandegrift at the low point of the battle when he believed it was likely his division would have to withdraw to the center of the island for a last-ditch fight. General Bill Twining wrote that report while recovering from malaria in Australia--far from many of the subordinate units whose contribution to the record would have been invaluable.

General Twining sets the historical record straight in this magnificent book by telling the Marines' Guadalcanal story in all its painful reality.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.