Divesting Nature's Capital: The Political Economy of Environmental Abuse in the Third World

Divesting Nature's Capital: The Political Economy of Environmental Abuse in the Third World

Divesting Nature's Capital: The Political Economy of Environmental Abuse in the Third World

Divesting Nature's Capital: The Political Economy of Environmental Abuse in the Third World

Excerpt

The possible limitations placed upon man's economic aspirations by the availability of the so-called renewable natural resources and the absorptive capacity of the natural environment have emerged as important issues for worldwide inquiry. Resource scarcities and environmental pollution have required far-reaching adaptations by governments, enterprises, and individuals in most parts of the world during the last two decades. Mounting concern about the pollution of air and water, particularly in the advanced industrial nations, prompted outcries from ordinary citizens and became a significant force shaping domestic political processes. The economics of public and private enterprise were substantially altered by increased demands that expenditures be made to reduce the amount of wastes released into the environment. Although fewer remedial actions have been initiated, attention has also been drawn to the possible long-term threats that man's activities may pose to the world's endowment of forests, agricultural land, fresh water and living species.

Our intention in this book is to examine how various natural resource and environmental constraints affect contemporary economic development strategies and prospects of the so-called developing nations in the world. We outline some of the key resource and environmental problems in the developing world and assess the possible implications these problems hold for long-term economic development. We also examine some of the responses being made in individual nations to such problems or, alternatively, some of the political-economic factors that make effective remedial actions very difficult in many countries.

Development specialists have paid considerable attention to the role that the exploitation of natural resources plays in economic development, but they have devoted much less attention to the relationship between long-term management of renewable natural resources and economic development. Generally, a coun-

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.