Battle for the World: The Strategy and Diplomacy of the Second World War

Battle for the World: The Strategy and Diplomacy of the Second World War

Battle for the World: The Strategy and Diplomacy of the Second World War

Battle for the World: The Strategy and Diplomacy of the Second World War

Excerpt

The second world war developed through a series of crises, each of which broke suddenly and was set apart from the previous one by a marked interval of time. It consisted of a chain of disasters between each of which there was a pause. Each event moved from a stage of creeping paralysis to one of high tensions and stormy climaxes that brought decisions in a short time. The Polish campaign took but eighteen days. The Norwegian campaign and the super-battle in the West together were fought out in the two and a half months that lay between the German landing in Oslo and the surrender of France. From the outbreak of the war in September 1939 to the spring of 1941 there were, all told, only a little more than three months of active, decisive operations. From the autumn of 1939 to the spring of 1940, and from the summer of 1940 to the spring of 1941, there were two long pauses. The German sea and air war against Britain during the second pause was but the preparation for more intensive action. These were dangerous pauses, and the second bids fair to be charged with even more storms than the first.

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