The Community of Europe: A History of European Integration since 1945

The Community of Europe: A History of European Integration since 1945

The Community of Europe: A History of European Integration since 1945

The Community of Europe: A History of European Integration since 1945

Synopsis

This hugely successful history of political and economic integration in Western Europe since the Second World War -- and especially, but by no means exclusively, the European Community itself -- was first published in 1991, to general acclaim. Since then much turbulent water has flowed under the bridges of Maastricht and Strasbourg. Now, in this welcome Second Edition, Derek Urwin has brought the story fully up to date, with an account of developments since 1991 and an assessment of the mood and prospects of Europe and the Community today.

Excerpt

The aim of this series is to describe and analyse the history of the World since 1945. History, like time, does not stand still. What seemed to many of us only recently to be 'current affairs' or the stuff of political speculation, has now become material for historians. The editors feel that it is time for a series of books which will offer the public judicious and scholarly, but at the same time readable, accounts of the way in which our present-day world has been shaped since the Second World War. The period which began in 1945 has witnessed political events and socio-economic developments of enormous significance for the human race, as important as anything which happened before Hitler's death or the bombing of Hiroshima. Ideologies have waxed and waned, the industrial economies have boomed and bust, empires of various types have collapsed, new nations have emerged and sometimes themselves fallen into decline. While we can be thankful that no major armed conflict occurred between the so-called superpowers, there have been many other wars, and terrorism emerged as an international plague. Although the position of ethnic minorities improved in some countries, it worsened dramatically in others. As communist tyrannies relaxed their grip on many areas of the world, so half-forgotten national conflicts reemerged. Nearly everywhere the status of women became an issue which politicians were unable to avoid. The same was true of the global environment, apparent threats to which have been a recurrent source of international concern. These are only some of the developments we hope will be illuminated by this series as it unfolds.

The books in the series will not follow any set pattern; they will vary in length according to the needs of the subject. Some will deal with regions, or even single nations, and others with themes. Not all of . . .

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