Marching with Sherman: Passages from the Letters and Campaign Diaries of Henry Hitchcock, Major and Assistant Adjutant General of Volunteers, November 1864-May 1865

Marching with Sherman: Passages from the Letters and Campaign Diaries of Henry Hitchcock, Major and Assistant Adjutant General of Volunteers, November 1864-May 1865

Marching with Sherman: Passages from the Letters and Campaign Diaries of Henry Hitchcock, Major and Assistant Adjutant General of Volunteers, November 1864-May 1865

Marching with Sherman: Passages from the Letters and Campaign Diaries of Henry Hitchcock, Major and Assistant Adjutant General of Volunteers, November 1864-May 1865

Excerpt

The purpose of this vsolume is to save from oblivion a remarkable young man's record of an experience quite extraordinary -- his close association with General Sherman for the seven months in the course of which lie made his historic marches across Georgia and northward through the Carolinas. At thirty-five this member of Sherman's staff was not to be counted a young man so much in comparison with his fellow officers of the Civil War as in the light of the seventythree years he was destined to live. At thirty-five he could bring to the experience that faced him not only the enthusiasm of his younger manhood but also a welltrained mind and lofty character already disciplined. These qualities he turned to valuable account, performing his daily duties to the evident satisfaction of his chief, and including faithfully among them the writing of elaborate diaries and detailed letters to his wife -- a record now first permitted to see the light after nearly sixty years.

This Civil War experience of Henry Hitchcock's stood as a detached episode in his long and fruitful life. Before discussing it in any detail, let us see what preceded and followed it. Though born ( July 3, 1829) at Spring Hill, near Mobile, Alabama, neither his father, Judge Henry Hitchcock, nor Colonel Andrew Erwin, the father of his mother, Anne Erwin, were natives of the South, the one having emigrated thither from Vermont, the other from the north of Ireland. His father, soon after graduating from the University of Vermont in 1813, had moved to Alabama, where he became an eminent lawyer and finally Chief Justice of the Su- . . .

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