Christianity and the Social Revolution

Christianity and the Social Revolution

Christianity and the Social Revolution

Christianity and the Social Revolution

Excerpt

In one of the world's greatest cities they have been building a cathedral. Originally it was intended to produce a vast auditorium in which the civic life could find space to demonstrate its unity. This was to be supplemented by a series of ancillary chapels appropriate to the particular interests of sections of the community. A Renaissance design was chosen, and the builders set vigorously to work. Then doubts arose. Was it consistent with tradition to provide for such cosmopolitan assemblies? Was it loyal to the Church to offer hospitality and a chapel to other denominations? Could the sense of worship be cultivated under a vast dome? Was not the architecture unsuitable? Was not the design bad? So a change was made. A new architect was appointed; Gothic was to be the mode of the edifice; the existing structure must be reconditioned; a nave in decorated style should be the dominant feature. Renaissance pillars were overlaid with Gothic capitals; round arches were filled in and pointed; a modernised version of the Lady Chapel at Ely was appended to the existing dome. In the finished building the only point that a harassed visitor could decently praise was the ingenuity of the second architect, and, rather tentatively, the symbolic interest of his performance.

For this is a story typical of our present position. We all desire to build a house for humanity. Large vague dreams of a new world occupy what time we can spare from the serious business of amusement or money-making.

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