A New Deal in Liquor, a Plea for Dilution

A New Deal in Liquor, a Plea for Dilution

A New Deal in Liquor, a Plea for Dilution

A New Deal in Liquor, a Plea for Dilution

Excerpt

IN A RECENT DEBATE in the United States Senate the question was asked: Why are Americans so much addicted to whisky and other forms of proof spirits? Why have we as a people so little inclination to milder and relatively harmless alcoholic beverages? What are the reasons why we differ in this respect from the French or the Germans or even the English?

The question is timely. It is our unfortunate habit of consuming beverages containing a much higher percentage of alcohol than do the people of other nations that makes the "liquor problem," as we have it, a problem almost peculiar to America. It is not so much the amount of alcohol as it is the concentrated and therefore highly intoxicating forms in which we consume it. American life is deficient in social pleasures: the sort of popular pleasure typified in the German beer garden attended by whole families, father, mother and children, to listen to music, eat cheap but wholesome food, and to drink (from . . .

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