Laboring and Dependent Classes in Colonial America, 1607-1783: Studies of the Economic, Educational, and Social Significance of Slaves, Servants, Apprentices and Poor Folk

Laboring and Dependent Classes in Colonial America, 1607-1783: Studies of the Economic, Educational, and Social Significance of Slaves, Servants, Apprentices and Poor Folk

Laboring and Dependent Classes in Colonial America, 1607-1783: Studies of the Economic, Educational, and Social Significance of Slaves, Servants, Apprentices and Poor Folk

Laboring and Dependent Classes in Colonial America, 1607-1783: Studies of the Economic, Educational, and Social Significance of Slaves, Servants, Apprentices and Poor Folk

Excerpt

Though the essays included in this volume discuss a considerable variety of topics, nevertheless there is a bond of unity which warrants their inclusion under the general title chosen. Each study illustrates the attitude of the state and upper classes toward the lower classes; the place of the latter in society; their economic and social status; their treatment, efforts for their industrial, religious, or secular education, or their support.

The various studies presented have been published over a considerable number of years in several historical magazines. They are here presented with some revision, but no attempt has been made to elaborate the chapters on the basis of new studies or new materials, which, however, have been examined. It does not appear that many essentially new principles would emerge from such materials.

The researches have been made in many different libraries and archives -- state, local, and private. These are too numerous to mention individually but special thanks are due the officials of the Library of Congress; the Newberry Library, Chicago; the American Antiquarian Society, Worcester; the Virginia State Library; the Virginia Historical Society; the Maryland Historical Society; the Charleston Library Society; the Massachusetts Historical Society; and the Connecticut Historical Society.

The officials of state and local archives were always very obliging in the use of material under their care. Special thanks are due to the officials of the state archives of Virginia, South Carolina, and Massachusetts and to the officials of the county archives of numerous counties in Virginia, and of Essex and Middlesex counties in Massachusetts.

Publication of this book is largely due to the interest, encouragement, and efforts of Dean Edith Abbott of the School of Social Service of the University of Chicago.

The author acknowledges, with thanks, the kindness of the editors and publishers of the various periodicals in which these studies originally appeared, indicated in the first note of each chapter. These publications are the American Historical Review, Harper's Monthly Magazine, the School Review, and the Social Service Review.

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.