A Bibliography of Latin America and the Caribbean, The Hilton Library

A Bibliography of Latin America and the Caribbean, The Hilton Library

A Bibliography of Latin America and the Caribbean, The Hilton Library

A Bibliography of Latin America and the Caribbean, The Hilton Library

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Excerpt

My collection of Latin American books has been developed over a period of some 35 years. Soon after my arrival at Stanford, I was asked to edit the third and greatly enlarged edition of Who's Who in Latin America. This gave me the opportunity to visit every country in Latin America and the Caribbean several times. Soon thereafter the university administration asked me to establish the Institute of Hispanic-American and Luso-Brazilian Studies; the clumsy title was chosen (it was later dropped) because the expression "Latin American" was then not quite respectable; the U. S. Government has traditionally avoided it in favor of "American Republics" or "Inter-American." Many "Hispanoamericanos" regarded "Latin America" as an alien tag, and it has now become fashionable to refer to our Latin American population as "Hispanics." This puts us on the other horn of the dilemma. The Spaniards and the Spanish Americans approved of the term "Hispanic American," but the Brazilians objected violently. We, therefore, added "and Luso-Brazilian," which appeased the Portuguese- speakers and had the unforeseen advantage of being an attention- getting gimmick. All kinds of scholars seeing the sign outside our building stopped by to find out what "Luso" meant, and this gave us an opportunity to indoctrinate the unwashed into the mysteries of our field.

As director of the Institute, I had frequent opportunities to tour Latin America. More arose in connection with my agreement to use KGEI, a powerful short-wave station belonging to General Electric, as "The University of the Air." The station had served propaganda purposes during World War II and had lost this function when official interest in Latin America dropped. Both at Stanford and in tours of Latin America, I interviewed many Latin American leaders in various fields. I simply asked them to tell their life story in their own language, and the tapes listed at the end of this volume have an unusual documentary value.

The last opportunity to make a protracted grand tour of Latin America and the Caribbean came in connection with the preparation of the volume The Scientific Institutions of Latin America, under a grant from the National Science Foundation. My wife and . . .

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