The Prints of Marian Korn: A Catalogue Raisonnae

The Prints of Marian Korn: A Catalogue Raisonnae

The Prints of Marian Korn: A Catalogue Raisonnae

The Prints of Marian Korn: A Catalogue Raisonnae

Excerpt

This volume is the record of a journey, the journey of an artist. It was a journey undertaken relatively late in life, at an age when most artists have matured. It is the more remarkable for that.

Marian Korn became an artist when the Korns' three daughters had grown up and left home, and when being an international hostess no longer seemed important. She needed a new challenge and a new vocation. When she was a young woman in peaceful, comfortable Czechoslovakia she had studied drawing. Now she turned to prints and began this journey.

As it must be with any artist, it was a journey deep into herself: to discover what was within her to express and how to express it.

Answers did not come easily. Living in Japan, she first made woodblocks. The very first that she permitted to survive has an ancient and purely Japanese subject, haniwa. She quickly turned to etching, however, a medium more akin to her European origins, and, though overtly Japanese subject matter lingered for a time, she was moving in another direction.

Her early prints, understandably, are mental. She was mastering technique and she was thinking her way. Some are witty, some satiric, some indignant. Some mirror politics international or politics sexual. Others reflect at many levels the struggle of every expatriate to come to terms with Japan.

As she grew as an artist she became more assured. The endless chain, the interconnectedness of things became a major theme. She could express what she felt: wit gave way to emotion.

Her medium remained a challenge and a fascination. She experimented constantly . . .

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