An Introduction to Sino-Foreign Relations

An Introduction to Sino-Foreign Relations

An Introduction to Sino-Foreign Relations

An Introduction to Sino-Foreign Relations

Excerpt

The following pages contain three of the lectures which the author promised to give in British universities under the auspices of the British Universities' China Committee but was prevented from so doing by unforeseen conflicting duties.As they are of more general interest than the rest, they are given publication here and in the 1940-41 issue of the Chinese Year Book.

As indicated by the common title with which they are designated in the present volume, these lectures, or chapters as they are called here, form an introduction to the study of Sino-foreign relations.They are meant to give respectively (a) the evolution of China as a political entity; (b) the background and existing situation of her normal relations with foreign states; and (c) the past and present of Japanese aggression, a problem which China and all other Far Eastern Powers have faced and are facing in common.Incidentally they describe a number of other points: Lecture I covers (d) the present status of Mongolia and Tibet; (e) the establishment of the nine new provinces, the major part of which once formed what were known to Occidentals as North Manchuria, Inner Mongolia, Chinese Central Asia, Kokonor and Tibetan Marches; and (f) the origin and present situation of Chinese communities abroad.Lecture II covers (g) the nature and extent of foreign garrison rights in the Peiping-Tientsin area; and (h) the history and status of the port of Shanghai; and Lecture III, (i) the fight of the Powers, especially the United States and Great Britain . . .

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