Handbook of Regional Cerebral Blood Flow

Handbook of Regional Cerebral Blood Flow

Handbook of Regional Cerebral Blood Flow

Handbook of Regional Cerebral Blood Flow

Synopsis

Handbook of Regional Cerebral Blood Flow unites the technical, clinical, and methodological developments in regional Cerebral Blood Flow (rCBF) as well as the research applications of rCBF from a variety of disciplines.

Handbook of Regional Cerebral Blood Flow provides a comprehensive, detailed overview of the most common modern technique for quantitative measurement of regional cerebral blood flow, responding to such changes as the proliferation and standardization of the rCBF instruments over the last decade and the growing impact of rCBF on diverse medical disciplines.

Excerpt

At a time when our library shelves already bulge under the weight of so many volumes, the introduction of another medical textbook demands justification. Ultimately this will be reflected by the response to the book, but some discussion of its origin and purpose is appropriate in the introduction.

This volume attempts to present a comprehensive, detailed overview of the most common modern technique for quantitative measurement of regional Cerebral Blood Flow (rCBF). This technique involves administration of tracer amounts of Xenon for a short period, by inhalation or intravenous injection, and external monitoring of its concentration by stationary detectors. a short monitoring period (10 to 15 minutes) and a noninvasive procedure, as well as relatively simple instrumentation, are among the advantages of such techniques. the proliferation and standardization of the instruments over the last decade, and their growing impact in diverse medical disciplines, are among the reasons for this volume.

Although theoretical insights by Roy and Sherrington predicted our field early as a century ago, the empirical story began with Kety and Schmidt in the late nineteen forties. Within a decade, much of what we now take for granted about the cerebral circulation had been elucidated. in the early sixties, Lassen and Ingvar introduced the radioactive inert gas method. This allowed examination of separate regions within the brain, and subsequently led to extraordinary pictures of regional cbf in health and disease, and the promise of more rational treatment for patients with cerebrovascular disorders. the utility of the method was limited by the need for arterial puncture, but within a few years the noninvasive era was ushered in by Veall and Mallett, who demonstrated that the isotope could be administered by inhalation. the field came of age in 1975 when Obrist and his colleagues provided the standard compartmental model.

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