The Chautauqua Movement: An Episode in the Continuing American Revolution

The Chautauqua Movement: An Episode in the Continuing American Revolution

The Chautauqua Movement: An Episode in the Continuing American Revolution

The Chautauqua Movement: An Episode in the Continuing American Revolution

Excerpt

In The Chautauqua Movement I have tried to set forth the beginnings of the most significant venture in popular education in the United States, and to place it in its proper setting in the history of our country.

Through the activities of the Chautauqua Institution, the great world was opened up to the incredibly isolated communities of our then new Middle West. Inaugurated for the purpose of training Sunday school teachers, the Institution rapidly expanded its course offerings and its popular appeal until it reached into thousands of culture-starved communities and helped give discipline and direction to angry and inchoate movements of social protest. Its influence on the founding and early years of one of our greatest universities significantly shaped the present pattern of American higher education.

The Chautauqua movement was not a single, unified, coherent plan, developed and directed by one man or a group of men. It was, fundamentally, a response to an unspoken demand, a sensitive alertness to the cravings of millions of people for "something better." It was a part of that tradition . . .

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