Small Nations, Giant Firms

Small Nations, Giant Firms

Small Nations, Giant Firms

Small Nations, Giant Firms

Excerpt

Making huge profits is not my bottom line. If I have a terrific year I worry whether I can manage a repeat performance.... This is a small subsidiary. Even doubling or tripling last year's profits would have little impact at headquarters. My bottom line is to make a satisfactory showing and, most important, not to waste my boss's time worrying about my territory... or too much of my own time on projects that should be well on their way.

(LIMA, 1973)

The excerpt cited above was taken from an interview with the manager of a world-renowned transnational corporation (TNC). This was my first encounter with an executive who was more worried about saving time than making money.

I had arrived in Lima to begin the second stage of a field study on transnational corporate investment strategies in the newly formed Andean Common Market (ANCOM). Stage one, which had taken nearly half a year, consisted of interviews in U.S. home offices of more than twenty TNCs with subsidiaries in both the ANCOM and Brazil. Stage two would take me to the capital cities of the then three largest ANCOM countries—Bogota, Colombia, Lima, Peru, and Santiago, Chile—and for a non-Andean contrast, to Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo, Brazil. There I met with TNC executives and discussed their plans for the subsidiaries they were managing. I also met with host country government officials and heard their views on how these giant firms could best advance the economic development of these Latin American nations. I would later return to the home offices and subsidiaries of six of these corporations to learn . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.