Branching Out: German-Jewish Immigration to the United States, 1820-1914

Branching Out: German-Jewish Immigration to the United States, 1820-1914

Branching Out: German-Jewish Immigration to the United States, 1820-1914

Branching Out: German-Jewish Immigration to the United States, 1820-1914

Synopsis

"The many thousands of Jews from German-speaking lands who came to the United States throughout the nineteenth century played a major part in laying the foundations of the Jewish community in America. The author considers these immigrants a branch of German Jewry, compelled to seek overseas the political and civil rights denied them at home. In this volume of the Ellis Island Series, the fascinating story of this mass immigration of mostly poor, enterprising, young people is told in vivid detail. Drawing on rare letters, diaries, memoirs, period newspapers, journals, and other firsthand accounts, Barkai traces the process of family-oriented chain migration, resettlement, and acculturation, exploring as well the group's relations with the Jewish community in Germany and with German and Jewish immigrants in the New World. Often starting out as peddlers and storekeepers, the immigrants moved back and forth from East Coast towns and cities to settlements in the South, Midwest, and Far West, helping to expand the American frontier and to develop cities such as Cincinnati St. Louis, Milwaukee, and San Francisco. The narrative chronicles their experiences in the goldfields of California, on Indian reservations, and during the Civil War, in which German-Jewish soldiers in the Union and Confederate armies struggled against bigotry to assert their civil rights. These engaging personal narratives are woven into an account of the formative role played by German-Jewish immigrants in establishing the institutional framework of the American-Jewish community. Their influential network of mutual aid and philanthropic organizations would be challenged, at the turn of the century, by the great mass migration of Jews from Eastern Europe. The author's presentation of the dramatic encounter between these two groups sheds new light not only on this critical period in American-Jewish history but also on the dynamics of cultural change in a pluralist society." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

At the end of the Napoleonic wars, about a quarter million Jews lived in German "Länder." Half of them lived in Prussia, some 53,000 in Bavaria, and about the same number in Posen, which had been annexed to Prussia in 1815. The legal, social, and economic position of the Jews in both regions, as elsewhere in Germany, was anything but favorable. In Bavaria, by a notorious law of 1813, no Jew was allowed to marry, to live permanently in any region, or to pursue any economic activity without being inscribed in the so-called "Matrikel," which fixed the number of "settled" Jews for every township and village. Once fixed, the list could not be expanded, not even to include descendants of the local Jewish families, to whom right of settlement was granted only after some place in the "Matrikel" became vacant because of death or migration. The declared policy was "not to enlarge the number of Jewish families in places where they exist, but on the contrary to gradually decrease it where it is too large."' In this aim the policy was quite successful: despite a remarkably high birthrate, Bavarian Jewry declined by emigration not only in relative . . .

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