Reason and the Common Good ; Selected Essays

Reason and the Common Good ; Selected Essays

Reason and the Common Good ; Selected Essays

Reason and the Common Good ; Selected Essays

Excerpt

Arthur Edward Murphy was born in Ithaca, New York, September 1, 1901, and died in Austin, Texas, May 11, 1962. Beginning and closing dates are the mere framework of a life, and in this case the life was one that was rich and varied in thought, activity, travel, amusement, writing, friendships, and influence. He taught philosophy in major universities in practically every section of the country and was chairman of the philosophy departments of four of these universities from 1939 until the time of his death. The extent and depth of his reading, understanding, and wisdom will be made apparent by the papers in this book, as will his almost uncanny ability to pick out and state in clarified form the essence and implications of someone else's thought.

Arthur Murphy received his A.B. from the University of California, as valedictorian, in 1923, and was awarded the University of California Medal, 1923, for the most distinguished student; he received his Ph.D. from the University of California in early 1926, after having spent the year 1924-25 in Europe on a Sigmund Heller Travelling Fellowship. He was an instructor in philosophy at the University of California in 1926-27, and at the University of Chicago in 1927-28. He went to Cornell University as an assistant professor of philosophy in 1928, and returned to Chicago as an associate professor in 1929. He was professor of philosophy at Brown University from 1931 to 1939, when he became head of the department of philosophy at the University of Illinois. He returned to Cornell in 1945, became chairman of the department there in 1946, and remained at Cornell eight years where he was Susan Linn Sage Professor of Philosophy from 1950 to 1953. He was executive officer of the department of philosophy at the University of Washington (Seattle) from 1953 to 1958, and chairman of the department of philosophy at the University of Texas from 1958 until his death. At various times he was visiting professor of philosophy at Columbia and Stanford Universities, and at the Universities of California at Los Angeles, Washington, Michigan, and Texas. He delivered countless lectures at institutions, conferences, and convocations in practically all parts of the country, and in Europe in 1937-38. Among the lectures he gave . . .

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