The Lexical Phonology of Slovak

The Lexical Phonology of Slovak

The Lexical Phonology of Slovak

The Lexical Phonology of Slovak

Synopsis

This book has both a descriptive and a theoretical purpose. It is the first full phonological description of Slovak, a language spoken by some four-and-a-half million people in Central and Eastern Europe; and it is a study of the theories of lexical, autosegmental, and prosodic phonology, with a particular emphasis on syllable structure. In a synthesis of these two aims, the author demonstrates how the theories can be integrated in a description of a single language. Particular importance is attached to the problem of phonological representations which, it is shown, must be three-dimensional. Both the independence and the interaction of the melodic, skeletal, and syllabic tiers are investigated in detail. The theoretical linguist will find here a detailed and comprehensive description of the language, deepened by an extensive debate on current phonological theory. For the Slavicist - of whatever theoretical persuasion - the book offers a discussion of the most recent theoretical developments in phonology, couched in the framework of a familiar type of linguistic material.

Excerpt

Jerzy Rubach The Lexical Phonology of Slovak will be the first thorough analysis of Slovak to become available to the community of linguists and would be a welcome addition to any series on modern phonology. It is therefore particularly fitting that it should appear as the first volume in this series, The Phonology of the World's Languages.

The aim of the series is to offer extensive treatments of the world's languages within a modern theoretical perspective. The reader may recall that the heyday of structuralist and of early generative phonology saw the publication of a large number of monographs on the phonology of individual languages. Thus in the late sixties, under the influence of the work of Morris Halle and Noam Chomsky--embodied in their monumental The Sound Pattern of English--many authors offered generative analyses of familiar and less familiar languages. One could cite, for example, Harris on Spanish, Kuroda on Yawelmani, McCawley on Japanese, and Schane on French. In recent years phonologists seem to have been less keen to provide comprehensive overviews of individual languages, except in pedagogical publications. Part of the reason has been rapid change in methods of phonological modelling and a preference for work testing delimited aspects of theory (for example, feature structure, vowel harmony, syllable structure, or stress) on individual languages. As a result, the information that we have about many languages is rather old, or is scattered in journals which are not always easily accessible. It would seem particularly useful to have, once again, thorough descriptions of some of the world's languages which make use of the concepts shared by phonologists working within modern theoretical frameworks.

The series can be characterized as 'generative' and 'non-linear' in approach. It is intended that authors of books in the series will espouse the ideal of explicitness which lies at the root of the generative tradition, and that they will also make use of some of the concepts of the non-linear tradition, in particular in the analysis of syllable structure and stress systems, and in extending the scope of distinctive features beyond individual segments. Volumes in the series will not, however, be theoretically monolithic. Diversity will be encouraged, and authors will undoubtedly pursue slightly different orientations within the guidelines set for them. This first monograph, for example, makes extensive use of the Lexical Phonology model, which organizes phonological derivations into morphologically based strata. Nevertheless, the reader will find that The Lexical Phonology of Slovak offers a full account of segmental structure and syllable structure, and is not solely concerned with the interaction . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.