China, the Land and the People: A Human Geography

China, the Land and the People: A Human Geography

China, the Land and the People: A Human Geography

China, the Land and the People: A Human Geography

Excerpt

In writing this book I have been conservative, as far as has been possible, in the matter of nomenclature, in order to make comparison with and reference to the older works more easy. The student is not unnaturally frightened when faced with the difficulty of Chinese nomenclature, and the changes of the last few years have added to these difficulties. In these pages, therefore, Peking has not become Peping, and the old provinces have been retained. The new provinces are Ningsia, formed out of part of Kansu and Inner Mongolia, Suiyuan, to the east of Ningsia, Chakhar, that region which lies round and to the north of Kalgan, the new provincial capital, Jehol, to the east of this region, while to the west are the new provinces of Ching Hai, with Sining as capital, and Sikang, which includes part of Szechwan and Tibet. As these new provincial names do not at present appear in foreign atlases they have not been used. As far as possible the spelling of the Chinese Postal Guide has been followed for Chinese place-names (in quoting Chinese words the more familiar Wade system has been adopted). Elsewhere I have tried to follow the R.G.S. system as embodied in their latest lists. Where names have altered, or where two names are in common use, I have preferred the more familiar, and in some cases have given two forms, the Chinese and the local name. Those who are familiar with the difficulties of Asiatic place-names will, I hope, forgive me where I have not been consistent, and on those occasions . . .

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