The Ethical Imperative: Why Moral Leadership Is Good Business

The Ethical Imperative: Why Moral Leadership Is Good Business

The Ethical Imperative: Why Moral Leadership Is Good Business

The Ethical Imperative: Why Moral Leadership Is Good Business

Synopsis

"Using case studies, diagrams, and a variety of charts and references, Dalla Costa sets out to show that business mirrors who we are as a society and the beliefs that we live by as individuals. Business leaders must assess their values and effect appropriate change as they function in the global economy where market forces have left the human dimension weaker while profits soared. (Dalla Costa) concludes that the economy is a wonderful invention, but that it must be managed as an instrument of humanity". -- Mary Whaley, Booklist

Excerpt

What are you working on?" For the last few years, I have answered that question knowing that "business ethics" is a concept about which everyone is ready to express an opinion. So visceral is their reaction that most people start explaining their views before I can offer either detail or caveat about nay own work. Such intrusiveness is understandable because business intrudes so forcefully into every aspect of modern life. The bottom line is now as much a feature of government, education, the arts and. even religion as it is of business. And with that logic comes the pressure to perform, to reengineer, restructure, compete and make a profit. Business thinking has become so pervasive that when something goes wrong in our society -- and much does -- the clunky footprint of free-market practices is inevitably found at the scene of the crime. The very combination of the two words business and ethics challenges people's experience and can elicit fear.

The range of response has been surprisingly broad. As people commented on my project, they revealed their passions, beliefs and ideologies. The cynics dismissed the whole topic as an oxymoron. Those to the right of my banker friends explained to me why communism had failed. Many of the people who have worked internationally felt compelled to share nightmare stories of under-the-table arm-twisting in Paris or of corrupt intermediaries in Kuala Lumpur. Bribes, don't you . . .

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