Mao Tse-Tung: The Man in the Leader

Mao Tse-Tung: The Man in the Leader

Mao Tse-Tung: The Man in the Leader

Mao Tse-Tung: The Man in the Leader

Excerpt

At the outset a word of warning. Some people are allergic to psychological interpretation. It is a scientific fact, as solid as that behind the Surgeon General's Warning, that some people become agitated, indeed inflamed, at the suggestion that childhood experiences can color adult behavior, and, more particularly, their blood will boil at the idea that such might be the case with great men of history. Anyone who suspects that he is so inclined should not read on.

Those who are prepared to go on have every right to ask what my biases are in the application of psychological insights to the study of great political leaders. In recent years there has been some interest in a new field of study called psychohistory. I have been greatly influenced by Erik H. Erikson, but I have also learned much, and at an earlier stage in my intellectual development, from other pioneers in the effort to apply an understanding of the unconscious to public affairs. As a political scientist I am deeply indebted to the work of Harold D. Lasswell, Gabriel A. Almond, and Nathan Leites, and I have been inspired by the studies of Alexander George, Arnold Rogow, Robert Lane, and James David Barber; as a social scientist I am indebted to a pantheon of scholars: Abram Kardiner, Ralph Linton, Clyde Kluckhohn, Alexander Inkeles, Ruth Benedict, Geoffrey Gorer, and many others. My inclination, therefore, is to accept my identity as a politi-

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