The Early Writings of Frederick Jackson Turner

The Early Writings of Frederick Jackson Turner

The Early Writings of Frederick Jackson Turner

The Early Writings of Frederick Jackson Turner

Excerpt

IT Is FITTING THAT among the first publications of the University of Wisconsin Press should appear the work of a Wisconsin scholar of outstanding fame, whose contribution is of enduring importance. Such a one was Frederick Jackson Turner, born in Wisconsin, educated at the University, teaching there a new viewpoint in American history. As a student and as a professor, Turner's early years were spent at the University of Wisconsin; there he drew the inspiration for his epoch-making essay "The Significance of the Frontier."

In that essay he called attention to earlier writings which have never been republished and which appeared originally in publications now virtually inaccessible. To understand the development of Turner's thought, these writings should be studied and their place in American historiography restored. Even the well-known "Significance of the Frontier" has not been reproduced as it was first conceived by the author and put into print for the State Historical Society of Wisconsin.

As this volume was being prepared for publication, it was discovered that one of Turner's students at Harvard University, Dr. Fulmer Mood, had written an essay on "Turner's Formative Period," based on Wisconsin sources. This illuminating study of the early years of Turner's scholarship, when his ideas were formulating, is here included through the kindness of Dr. Mood, now of the University of California.

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