The California Coastal Plan: A Critique

The California Coastal Plan: A Critique

The California Coastal Plan: A Critique

The California Coastal Plan: A Critique

Excerpt

In November 1972 the voters of California adopted the Coastal Initiative (Proposition 20) declaring a general state policy "to preserve, protect, and where possible, to restore the resources of the coastal zone for the enjoyment of the current and succeeding generations." Toward this end the initiative established temporary commissions to prepare a permanent coastal plan, while controlling development during the interim period.

On December 1, 1975, the California Coastal Zone Conservation Commission submitted a 433-page Coastal Plan to Governor Brown, the California Legislature, and the people of California. The Plan contains 162 policy statements on problems including marine environment, coastal land environment, coastal development, energy, transportation, recreation, and other subjects, and a special section on problems of carrying out the Plan.

If adopted by the legislature and signed by the governor, the California Coastal Plan will have important economic and social implications both for the people of California and for other states which either have coastal land planning mechanisms or are considering them.

At the present time nine other states either have or are preparing coastal plans. Moves to establish a coastal management plan have been defeated in only one state (Maine). But no state as yet has a plan as far-reaching and expensive as the one just proposed for California.

The problem of the coast, like environmental problems generally, deserves the serious attention of all citizens concerned . . .

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