De Grammaticis et Rhetoribus

De Grammaticis et Rhetoribus

De Grammaticis et Rhetoribus

De Grammaticis et Rhetoribus

Synopsis

Suetonius (b. c. 70), was a man of letters writing under the emperors Trajan and Hadrian. This is a new and definitive critical edition of his most important surviving work, On the Study of Grammar and Rhetoric, on Roman education and culture. A unique and exceptionally rich source for our understanding of Roman cultural history, this book provides a complete Latin text, the first ever English translation, and the most extensive social and historical commentary yet produced.

Excerpt

The premisses underlying my text and apparatus, and discussions of a number of textual problems, have already been set out in the monograph Studies on the Text of Suetonius 'De grammaticis et rhetoribus': the history and constitution of the text accordingly take up little space in the present book. The introduction is meant above all to be a 'user's guide' to the text, orienting the reader to the tradition in which Suetonius was writing and to his aims and methods. I have included a translation both to make my own understanding of the text clear and to make the DGR useful to teachers who must introduce the basic structures of Roman culture to students with little or no Latin. The commentary, however, is intended primarily for advanced students and scholars and presumes a knowledge of Latin and Greek; grammatical and stylistic matters are for the most part addressed only when they are implicated in special problems of interpretation.

A draft of the introduction, edition, and commentary was completed in early autumn 1992 and was revised over the next twelve months. I have tried to refer to work that became available in the course of my revisions, most notably E. Courtney's valuable commentary on the fragmentary Latin poets. I was not able to consult M.-C. Vacher's new edition of the DGR (Paris, 1993), of which I learned only as I set about writing this preface.

Once again it is a delight to thank institutions and individuals responsible for supporting or improving my work. The greater part of the commentary was drafted during a marvellous year's leave of absence, for which I am indebted equally to the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation and the Division of the Humanities in the University of Chicago. The University's Regenstein Library remains a wonder of the academic world for which I am grateful daily. Hilary O'Shea was by turns gently patient and briskly efficient in seeing this project to completion for Oxford University Press; and no student of ancient Greece and Rome could want a better copy-editor than Leofranc Holford- Strevens. My thanks must also go to a number of people who . . .

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